Python – Exploring variables

Hello friends,

Today in this article we are going to discuss about variables in Python

What is variable?

A variable is like a container in which we can store value.

A variable is only a name given to a memory location, all the operations done on the variable effects that memory location.

Rules to create variables –

  • A variable name must start with a letter or the underscore character.
  • A variable name cannot start with a number.
  • A variable name can only contain alpha-numeric characters and underscores (A-z, 0-9, and _ ).
  • Variable names are case-sensitive (name, Name and NAME are three different variables).

Lets create a simple program using variable

Output

30
110011.1
Jack

Declare the Variable:

Number  = 500
print(Number)
-------------------------
In[1] runfile (...)
500

Assigning a single value to multiple variables: 

a = b = c = "Hello"
print(a)
print(b)
print(c)
-----------------------------
In[1] runfile (...)
Hello
Hello
Hello

Assigning different values to multiple variables: 

Python allows adding different values in a single line with “,”operators.

a, b, c = 10, 200.9, "Knowledgejunction"
  
print(a)
print(b)
print(c)
---------------------------
In[1] runfile (...)
10
200.9
Knowledgejunction

Using the same name for different types

a = 100
a = "Knowledgejunction"
print(a)
--------------------------------
In[1] runfile (...)
Knowledgejunction

How does + operator work with variables? 

a = 50
b = 20
print(a+b)
  
a = "Knowledge"
b = "junction"
print(a+b)
---------------------------------
In[1] runfile (...)
70
Knowledgejunction

Can we use + for different types also? 

No using for different types would produce error. 

a = 100
b = "Knowledge"
print(a+b)
In[1] runfile (...)
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'int' and 'str'

We have very good series of Python articles, please have a look –

Thank you

Have nice day 🙂

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